Ancient Civilizations

MusicForFish

Ultra Maga Instinct
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Jesus bro. I said I didnt watch the video. I just couldnt imagine their would be much fucking mystery behind the fucking object that they made a whole fucking 10 minute video about. Calm down. Dont hyperventilate. Shit'll be ok.
Do you even
Art Illustration GIF by meityform

man?!??
 
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Kharzette

Watcher of Overs
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I always figured this gene came from the eastern steppe, but the map shows western russia:

 
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Daidraco

Golden Baronet of the Realm
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I always figured this gene came from the eastern steppe, but the map shows western russia:


Interesting little research project. Milk being such a staple of the US menu makes you forget that not everyone in the world has that same advantage.

I dont think it is completely out of the grasp of reality that northern Europe in 5000 BC had a roaming ruler, or rulers, that worked similar to the Khans (~1200ad). Where he/they would bed every single woman they could in order to sew their genetic dynasty across their empire. An ancient grandpa to all of us white folk, that gifted us with his tribes genetic propensity to have lactase persistence. I feel like it is common sense that a significantly large war band would have a huge herd of cattle behind them that would feed them in that time frame. Northern tribes across that climate zone had a knack for curing meat, so they would be well fed even in the winter time.

That battle is something else though. With what researchers say, and even in that video they somewhat agree with it - the population wasnt suppose to even be that plentiful in that time period per square mile. If we go off the conventional belief, then that many men came from more than just a 100km radius.. and to me that would make a lot more sense. But on that same note, its not like we have actual proof that the population wasnt higher than what we "think" and it was these roaming war bands that decimated the population on a scale we havent seen when proportionately compared. Would be interesting to follow up on that after more research has been found.
 
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Sylas

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Interesting little research project. Milk being such a staple of the US menu makes you forget that not everyone in the world has that same advantage.

I dont think it is completely out of the grasp of reality that northern Europe in 5000 BC had a roaming ruler, or rulers, that worked similar to the Khans (~1200ad). Where he/they would bed every single woman they could in order to sew their genetic dynasty across their empire. An ancient grandpa to all of us white folk, that gifted us with his tribes genetic propensity to have lactase persistence. I feel like it is common sense that a significantly large war band would have a huge herd of cattle behind them that would feed them in that time frame. Northern tribes across that climate zone had a knack for curing meat, so they would be well fed even in the winter time.

That battle is something else though. With what researchers say, and even in that video they somewhat agree with it - the population wasnt suppose to even be that plentiful in that time period per square mile. If we go off the conventional belief, then that many men came from more than just a 100km radius.. and to me that would make a lot more sense. But on that same note, its not like we have actual proof that the population wasnt higher than what we "think" and it was these roaming war bands that decimated the population on a scale we havent seen when proportionately compared. Would be interesting to follow up on that after more research has been found.
Obviously the OG Genghis Khan
When he ruled during the 13th century, Genghis Khan presided over land that spanned from the Pacific coast of China to the Caspian Sea. Historians don’t know exactly how many children Genghis Khan sired, but many agree his lineage is broad. In 1260, Persian historian ‘Ata-Malik Juvaini wrote: “Of the issue of the race and lineage of Chingiz [Genghis] Khan, there are now living in the comfort of wealth and affluence more than 20,000.”
but in studying Y chromosome DNA they found 10 other asian lineages that are nearly as wide spread.
So, who were the other super-fertile fathers? One genetic sequence is attributed to Giocangga, the grandfather of the founder of the Qing dynasty. His Y chromosome was linked in a 2005 study to 1.5 million men in modern northern China. This large number likely resulted from his descendants taking many wives and concubines.
this study was specifically of asian men but there are others:
Large genetic legacies are not confined to that part of the globe. According to a 2006 study in the American Journal of Human Genetics, 1 in 12 Irishmen worldwide can trace their heritage back to a single individual. That man may be a fifth-century Irish warlord dubbed Niall of the Nine Hostages, who could have as many as three million direct male descendants in modern times.
 
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Kharzette

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BTW some stone softening vids have popped up on youtube. Most are kinda unwatchable but at least people are doing experiments and figuring stuff out.

The best one I saw used molten Natron
 
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Burns

Avatar of War Slayer
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Watching this video on carving limestone, using stone (from a channel Bandwagon Bandwagon found in the Video thread) made me think of the Chucks following post. It seems to relate to other posts I've seen here too (whenever I parachute in):


So, of course, it made me do a quick search on this too:
the real mystery is how did they create such an intricate sculpture out of a material like andesite which no primitive tools can can cut.
2024-07-20 19.38.16 www.quora.com 419f7203883d.png

2024-07-20 19.15.53 www.quora.com 7de5db3732ca.png

Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians, Vol. 44, No. 2 (May, 1985), pp. 161-182 (22 pages): Inca Quarrying and Stonecutting

Granite and Andesite are similar hardness:
 
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