EE question

Palum

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#1
Hi, it's been a while since my EE classes, I need some real engineering insight before I make a terrible messy mistake on a guitar...

I have used conductive spray paint to create a RF shell to kill interference. I'm also using it to ground out all metal parts (passive audio equipment so no real current). However some of the switches are making contact with the paint due to a tight fit causing a short. TL:DR: I want to use paint or more likely a rubberized coating to cover the RF shield paint where the switches are. Can you think of any negative side-effects from this approach? I shouldn't think putting a non conductive layer would effect the RF damping effect of the conductive layer.
 

Kobayashi

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#2
Hi, it's been a while since my EE classes, I need some real engineering insight before I make a terrible messy mistake on a guitar...

I have used conductive spray paint to create a RF shell to kill interference. I'm also using it to ground out all metal parts (passive audio equipment so no real current). However some of the switches are making contact with the paint due to a tight fit causing a short. TL:DR: I want to use paint or more likely a rubberized coating to cover the RF shield paint where the switches are. Can you think of any negative side-effects from this approach? I shouldn't think putting a non conductive layer would effect the RF damping effect of the conductive layer.
I'm thinking it shouldn't be an issue. I would just ensure the metal body of the switch is still bonded to the conductive layer (hopefully one of the poles of the switch isn't tied to this). You want to make sure the conductive layer is continuous around what you want to protect - your rubber coating would be on the inside of that shell.
 

Palum

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#3
I'm thinking it shouldn't be an issue. I would just ensure the metal body of the switch is still bonded to the conductive layer (hopefully one of the poles of the switch isn't tied to this). You want to make sure the conductive layer is continuous around what you want to protect - your rubber coating would be on the inside of that shell.
Right - my plan is to keep the 'shell' in tact. The only penetration is one screw lead that grounds the shell, my plan is to leave a ring open around that so there's no issue with the contact. All of the components share a common ground so the actual switch plate and body, the pickups, etc. will still all be grounded out.

Thanks
 

tyen

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#4
manastone