Pan'Theon: Rise' of th'e Fal'Len - #1 Thread in MMO

Tide27

Vyemm Raider
929
5,119
53d 3h 29m
I don't really know a lot about WOW. I only played it for a few months at Howie's Game Shack in Anaheim in 2007. I wasnt able to play EQ on my aunt's computer during this time due the system specs.

I don't know much about Chris Metzen or Mike Morhiem, but I would like to understand more on what made WOW so great. I have watched videos on the history. I have heard different things thru the years. I would love to interview you regardless. I love listening to a great MMO story and I know my fans would too. Right now, I am a nobody when it comes to content creation. I have a lot of good ideas on how to take my show. My last name being Rogan like in Joe Rogan. My podcast is called The Dead Toe Society. I have spent the majority my gaming experience playing EQ. I can honestly say that I would treat you better than someone one like Asmon or Bellular. I am sure they would try to clown you for their viewership with all of the WOW issues from the past, whereas I would be a little more compassionate to listening to you instead of questioning you. I eun a judgement free zone for my show. Think about it Chris. Let me know.

I knew that World of Warcraft already had existing storyline with Warcraft. Instead, I played Age of Empires and Civilization V. Alex from what I understand helped develop a lot of lore within inside the original storyline to get hired on at Blizzard. Alex was a great raid leader, also, a very passionate raid leader. I would describe him more of a storyboard developer. Holly used to write copy for Microsoft before EQ and now she works for Microsoft again. Maybe a creative developer would be considered the end position of a storyboard developer.

i would give Alex a hard time on the FL Raids. One day he asked me if I was wearing my red shirt. i said yes. How did you know. I dont play WOW so the comment went over my head. I have asberger's syndrome for those people who dont know. It wasnt until years later I got the joke. Alex is all business.

As far as the Pantheon community, my future was determined years ago. I created a kick ass website thru Enjin about Pantheon. I had a custom app for Pantheon Radio. In all honesty it was a nice-looking site. It was definitely unique. Minus was developing his website at the time, and I guess for the lack of a better word got scared. He tried to bully me, and I gave in and took down my site. It was a lot of hard work making the site without the proper help. During this time, minus tried to play the Gate keeper for the community. VR gave in to him because he had the community support behind him. Earlier, he tried that shit with the WOW content creators, and they send him packing with WOW Plus. Minus is a very passionate player too and works really hard at his job. To be honest here, i knew if I didn't get some help, I knew I could not give the website the proper attention it needed. It was stressing me out. It was more a passion than a job at that point. Originally, I figure Pantheon needed my help after brad passed away so i hit the road running.

I feel like you think you are somehow relevent to this genre, conceited, and a bit full of yourself.

Just reading half the shit youve posted here recently strikes me as the old girlfriend / jealous type that goes fucking nuts when you break up with her.
 
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xmod2

<Gold Donor>
564
987
24d 17h 42m
To be honest here, i knew if I didn't get some help, I knew I could not give the website the proper attention it needed.
You and Nirgon should team up to run the most successful Pantheon site on the internet. Who knows, they may even hire you then you guys will get to play it.
 
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Ambiturner

Naxxramas 1.0 Raider
12,172
13,306
132d 19h 51m
I don't really know a lot about WOW. I only played it for a few months at Howie's Game Shack in Anaheim in 2007. I wasnt able to play EQ on my aunt's computer during this time due the system specs.

I don't know much about Chris Metzen or Mike Morhiem, but I would like to understand more on what made WOW so great. I have watched videos on the history. I have heard different things thru the years. I would love to interview you regardless. I love listening to a great MMO story and I know my fans would too. Right now, I am a nobody when it comes to content creation. I have a lot of good ideas on how to take my show. My last name being Rogan like in Joe Rogan. My podcast is called The Dead Toe Society. I have spent the majority my gaming experience playing EQ. I can honestly say that I would treat you better than someone one like Asmon or Bellular. I am sure they would try to clown you for their viewership with all of the WOW issues from the past, whereas I would be a little more compassionate to listening to you instead of questioning you. I eun a judgement free zone for my show. Think about it Chris. Let me know.

I knew that World of Warcraft already had existing storyline with Warcraft. Instead, I played Age of Empires and Civilization V. Alex from what I understand helped develop a lot of lore within inside the original storyline to get hired on at Blizzard. Alex was a great raid leader, also, a very passionate raid leader. I would describe him more of a storyboard developer. Holly used to write copy for Microsoft before EQ and now she works for Microsoft again. Maybe a creative developer would be considered the end position of a storyboard developer.

i would give Alex a hard time on the FL Raids. One day he asked me if I was wearing my red shirt. i said yes. How did you know. I dont play WOW so the comment went over my head. I have asberger's syndrome for those people who dont know. It wasnt until years later I got the joke. Alex is all business.

As far as the Pantheon community, my future was determined years ago. I created a kick ass website thru Enjin about Pantheon. I had a custom app for Pantheon Radio. In all honesty it was a nice-looking site. It was definitely unique. Minus was developing his website at the time, and I guess for the lack of a better word got scared. He tried to bully me, and I gave in and took down my site. It was a lot of hard work making the site without the proper help. During this time, minus tried to play the Gate keeper for the community. VR gave in to him because he had the community support behind him. Earlier, he tried that shit with the WOW content creators, and they send him packing with WOW Plus. Minus is a very passionate player too and works really hard at his job. To be honest here, i knew if I didn't get some help, I knew I could not give the website the proper attention it needed. It was stressing me out. It was more a passion than a job at that point. Originally, I figure Pantheon needed my help after brad passed away so i hit the road running.

Just what this thread needed. You'll fit right in
 
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Reactions: Erronius and Rali

krysanth

Silver Knight of the Realm
202
93
3d 30m
I don't really know a lot about WOW. I only played it for a few months at Howie's Game Shack in Anaheim in 2007. I wasn't able to play EQ on my aunt's computer during this time due the system specs.

I don't know much about Chris Metzen or Mike Morhiem, but I wanted to know more about what made WOW so great. I have watched videos on its history. Furthermore, I have heard different things thru the years. I would love to interview you regardless. I love listening to a great MMO story and I know my fans would too. Right now, I am a nobody when it comes to content creation. I have a lot of good ideas on how to take my show. My last name being Rogan like in Joe Rogan. My podcast is called The Dead Toe Society. I have spent the majority my gaming experience playing EQ. I can honestly say that I would treat you better than someone one like Asmon or Bellular. I am sure they would try to clown you for their viewership with all of the WOW issues from the past, whereas I would be a little more compassionate to listening to you instead of questioning you. I run a judgement free zone on my show. Think about it Chris. Let me know.

I knew that World of Warcraft already had an existing storyline with Warcraft. Instead, I choose to play Age of Empires and Civilization V. Alex from what I understand helped to develop a lot of lore within inside the original storyline to get hired on at Blizzard. Alex was a great raid leader, also, a very passionate raid leader. I would describe him more of a storyboard developer. Holly used to write copy for Microsoft before EQ and now she works for Microsoft again. Maybe a creative developer would be considered the end position of a storyboard planner and developer.

i would always give Alex a hard time on the FL Raids. One day he asked me if I was wearing my red shirt. I said yes. How did you know? I don't play WOW so the comment went over my head at the time. I have Asperger's syndrome for those people who dont know. It wasn't until years later I got the joke and i got right on it. Alex is all business.

As far as the Pantheon community, my future was determined years ago. I created a kick ass website thru Enjin about Pantheon. I had a custom app for Pantheon Radio. In all honesty it was a nice-looking site. It was definitely unique. Minus was developing his website at the time, and I guess for the lack of a better word he got scared. He tried to bully me like an OG, and I gave in and took down my site. It was a lot of hard work making the site without the proper help. During this time, minus tried to play the Gate keeper for the community. VR gave in to him because he had the community support behind him. Earlier, he tried that shit with the WOW content creators, and they send him home packing with WOW Plus. Minus is a very passionate player too and works really hard at his job. To be honest here, i knew if I didn't get some help, I knew I could not give the website the proper attention it needed. It was stressing me out. It was more a passion than a job at this point. Originally, I figure Pantheon needed my help after Brad passed away so i hit the road running.

lol.

This shit that serious eh. This forum continues to deliver me lolz
 
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Chris

Potato del Grande
13,394
480
93d 20h 4m
I don't know much about Chris Metzen or Mike Morhiem, but I wanted to know more about what made WOW so great. I have watched videos on its history. Furthermore, I have heard different things thru the years. I would love to interview you regardless. I love listening to a great MMO story and I know my fans would too. Right now, I am a nobody when it comes to content creation. I have a lot of good ideas on how to take my show. My last name being Rogan like in Joe Rogan. My podcast is called The Dead Toe Society. I have spent the majority my gaming experience playing EQ. I can honestly say that I would treat you better than someone one like Asmon or Bellular. I am sure they would try to clown you for their viewership with all of the WOW issues from the past, whereas I would be a little more compassionate to listening to you instead of questioning you. I run a judgement free zone on my show. Think about it Chris. Let me know.
Are you talking to me? I'm not Chris Metzen and he has never been on this forum.
 

Aazrael

Ahn'Qiraj Raider
1,314
1,738
103d 2h 40m
south-park-arseburgers.gif
 
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Nirgon

YOU HAVE NO POWER HERE
8,897
13,709
73d 5h 36m
We should join it and start discussing crafting like it's real and has rules.

"Hey guys I want to make a +3 Diamond Sword but I'm not sure which binding is the best. Any ideas?"

Should go link normie tier gifs over there and get made fun of whenever new content is released
 

Mr. Sox

Bronze Knight of the Realm
506
246
5d 1h 33m
Good news i have started work on my first episode entitled for the Dead Toe Society: Pledges vs. Purchases in Crowd Funding MMOs. Its gonna be epic.
 
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Reactions: Nirgon and Daidraco

Mr. Sox

Bronze Knight of the Realm
506
246
5d 1h 33m
heres my introduction so far-

The video game industry has had to evolve a number of times since it’s inception in the 80’s. And over the years, this has seen it grown to the point of being a cultural behemoth which regularly draws in more annual income than Hollywood.

That said, with so much developer money being allocated to big budget AA games, ones which are considered a far safer investment, this has left the mid and lower tiered indie titles often struggling to find funding.

Luckily, with the advent of the internet, a solution to his problem would come in the form of crowd sourcing. And since that point, crowd sourcing has gone on to also become a big factor in the creation and development of many MMO’s. But is this a good or a bad thing, well that’s what were going to try and break down today, all as, hopefully, well also give you some valuable information on how the video game industry operates.

But before we go any further, we have to define our terms, and the two main terms here are crowd funding and MMO’s. So let’s start with the former then. What is crowd funding?

Well, in short it’s the practice of funding a project or venture by raising money from a large group of people. Historically, this has been done by those looking to funds artistic projects, sell bonds during times of war, or even fund medical bills in some countries. In fact, in one particularly notable case in 1885, crowd funding was even used to help save construction of The Statue of Liberty after that project had hit a financial snag.

And while years ago, money may have been gathered through things like fundraisers or door to door work, in modern times its more commonly done through the internet, with there now being a number of websites specifically set up for such a purpose.

In fact, so ubiquitous has the practice now become that, in 2015 alone, it was estimated that over 34 Billion US dollars were raised worldwide through the process of crowd funding.

So, now that we have a better understanding of what this is, let’s move on to our next term, MMO’s .

Well, while we’re sure any gamers out there will already be familiar with the term, for those who aren’t as adept with the industry, an MMO is basically short hand for the longer term MMORPG, or Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing Game.

Fast forward to today then, and MMO’s have in many ways taken over the video game industry, with more established franchises such as Grand Theft Auto and The Elder Scrolls now starting to dip their toes into the waters too with smaller online versions of their own games.

And while this has allowed for a lot more interaction between gamers who previously would have had no connection with one another, the success of the genre has meant that, as with other big money making titles, funding for MMO’s has largely been saved for bigger titles that are more likely to make large amounts of money.

As well as that, there was also the noteworthy case of TitanReach which, in 2020, right as the scandal of Chronicles of Elyria was making waves amongst the MMO world, was in as equally grim of a state when their developers, Square Root Studios, were outright accused of committing fraud.

Why is that you ask? Well, after raising almost 200,000 US dollars in a Kickstarter campaign posted earlier that year, it came to light that, even though they hadn’t met their initial goal of $430,000, the team would be keeping the money and adopting a month to month crowd funding model from there that they hoped would see them be able to raise the remainder of the necessary money as they went on.

Sadly however, come August of 2021, one of the lead developer’s would announce on the games Discord that the whole project was going to be cancelled effective immediately, with him reasoning that, as was the case with Chronicles of Elyria, they had simply run out of money.

And while this quickly raised alarm bells within the game community, it would soon get worse as it would later come to light that, at least according to the accusations of an anonymous YouTuber who claims to be close to the project, much of the funding for the title had been wasted by the developers on crypto currency.

Yes, it seems like, in an attempt to raise the remainder of the money necessary to complete the work, Square Roots Studios had decided to gamble what they had on online investments, with them even allegedly buying shares in Tesla at one point.

In the end though, this looks to have backfired on them as, with crypto currency in particular being a notoriously volatile market, they seem to have lost it all, leading many to accuse them of mismanaging their money instead of using it to build the game that they had promised.

So, surly then, the answer to avoiding a situation like this would be to opt for an alternative method of investing? Well, as it happens, that may not necessarily be the case.

But before we look into that any deeper, let’s take a second to define what exactly this other source is, as when pledging just doesn’t work, you might want to opt for purchase instead.

So, with this once again leaving more middle and small tier developers struggling, they’ve found themselves turning to crowd sourcing, bringing us right back to where we began.

Yes, without crowd sourcing, the reality is that many of these titles simply would not get made and, as a result of this, a lot of great art simply would never see the light of day, works such as Pathfinder Online, released in its alpha stage in 2014, Shadowrun Chronicles: Boston Lockdown, released in its beta stage in 2015, or Pantheon: Rise of the Fallen, a game with is currently in pre alpha testing.

And most of these projects have been funded through the number one website for such purposes online right now Kickstarter.

Of course, even if you’re not that familiar with video games, you should be familiar with Kickstarter as, since its inception in 2009, it has become the go to platform for those looking to crowd source a project. And this is because of the ease of use it allows, with it letting users sign up, put up an ad, and offer any number of incentives for people to make a financial pledge from there.

In fact, so popular has Kickstarter become, it has helped to fund a number of big projects over the years, including the Oculus Rift, a virtual reality gaming headset that was later purchased by Facebook for 2 Billion US dollars.

That’s not to say they’re the only game in town though as, outside of Kickstarter, there are a number of crowd sourcing websites out there, including but not limited to Indiegogo, Bonfire and Fundly.

As well as that, there was also the noteworthy case of TitanReach which, in 2020, right as the scandal of Chronicles of Elyria was making waves amongst the MMO world, was in as equally grim of a state when their developers, Square Root Studios, were outright accused of committing fraud.

Why is that you ask? Well, after raising almost 200,000 US dollars in a Kickstarter campaign posted earlier that year, it came to light that, even though they hadn’t met their initial goal of $430,000, the team would be keeping the money and adopting a month to month crowd funding model from there that they hoped would see them be able to raise the remainder of the necessary money as they went on.

Sadly however, come August of 2021, one of the lead developer’s would announce on the games Discord that the whole project was going to be cancelled effective immediately, with him reasoning that, as was the case with Chronicles of Elyria, they had simply run out of money.

And while this quickly raised alarm bells within the game community, it would soon get worse as it would later come to light that, at least according to the accusations of an anonymous YouTuber who claims to be close to the project, much of the funding for the title had been wasted by the developers on crypto currency.

Yes, it seems like, in an attempt to raise the remainder of the money necessary to complete the work, Square Roots Studios had decided to gamble what they had on online investments, with them even allegedly buying shares in Tesla at one point.

In the end though, this looks to have backfired on them as, with crypto currency in particular being a notoriously volatile market, they seem to have lost it all, leading many to accuse them of mismanaging their money instead of using it to build the game that they had promised.

So, surly then, the answer to avoiding a situation like this would be to opt for an alternative method of investing? Well, as it happens, that may not necessarily be the case.

But before we look into that any deeper, let’s take a second to define what exactly this other source is, as when pledging just doesn’t work, you might want to opt for purchase instead.
 
Last edited:

Chris

Potato del Grande
13,394
480
93d 20h 4m
heres my introduction so far-

The video game industry has had to evolve a number of times since it’s inception in the 80’s. And over the years, this has seen it grown to the point of being a cultural behemoth which regularly draws in more annual income than Hollywood.

That said, with so much developer money being allocated to big budget AA games, ones which are considered a far safer investment, this has left the mid and lower tiered indie titles often struggling to find funding.

Luckily, with the advent of the internet, a solution to his problem would come in the form of crowd sourcing. And since that point, crowd sourcing has gone on to also become a big factor in the creation and development of many MMO’s. But is this a good or a bad thing, well that’s what were going to try and break down today, all as, hopefully, well also give you some valuable information on how the video game industry operates.

But before we go any further, we have to define our terms, and the two main terms here are crowd funding and MMO’s. So let’s start with the former then. What is crowd funding?

Well, in short it’s the practice of funding a project or venture by raising money from a large group of people. Historically, this has been done by those looking to funds artistic projects, sell bonds during times of war, or even fund medical bills in some countries. In fact, in one particularly notable case in 1885, crowd funding was even used to help save construction of The Statue of Liberty after that project had hit a financial snag.

And while years ago, money may have been gathered through things like fundraisers or door to door work, in modern times its more commonly done through the internet, with there now being a number of websites specifically set up for such a purpose.

In fact, so ubiquitous has the practice now become that, in 2015 alone, it was estimated that over 34 Billion US dollars were raised worldwide through the process of crowd funding.

So, now that we have a better understanding of what this is, let’s move on to our next term, MMO’s .

Well, while we’re sure any gamers out there will already be familiar with the term, for those who aren’t as adept with the industry, an MMO is basically short hand for the longer term MMORPG, or Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing Game.
I think that people looking a show about MMOs and game design would appreciate more definitions and basic information.
 
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