The Great Outdoors

Comrade Araysar

Russian Turdgod
<Silver Donator>
43,053
81,199
I grew up doing a lot of camping. Many a summer swamp ass in florida. Very brutal camping in fla summers. I do travel a lot and love minimalism. I always aim for the lightest and tightest as far as backpacking goes. I use the hell out of these REI compression bags. Love them.


Also kinda random but I'd highly recommend ex officio underwear. Found it many years ago when I first started backpacking/travel. Shit absorbs smell so good. Screamfeeder Screamfeeder random but have you tried ex officio? Not sure if it's as big in the camping world as it is in airplane backpacking/travel.

Dont fall for it Screamfeeder Screamfeeder - he'll be asking you to mail him some of your soiled underwear next.
 
  • 1WTF
  • 1Seriously?
Reactions: Kithani and Foler

Screamfeeder

The Dirtbag
<Banned>
13,309
11,199
51d 10h 31m
Thinking about going for Denali but being on glacier covered mountain for potentially 20+ days to do it can be brutal.
Awesome pictures! I've done Rainer but via the much easier (and way more crowded) Disappointment route. My ice skills are sorely lacking and with COVID and possibly more fires, all the training I was planning on doing in the Sierras this year is put on hold.

Denali is a huge step up and on my list as well.
 

dizzie

Triggered Happy
2,247
3,561
83d 11h 39m
Been on a bunch of treks, Nepal 3x, South America twice travelling for a long ass time. Done some reasonably high stuff in those countries.

Mera Peak
Cotopaxi
Chimborazo
Annapurna Circuit (one and a half times as I got sick the first attempt and ended up being flown out).
Everest Base Camp Trek

Hit quite a few peaks in Europe. I enjoy the mountains but I wouldn't consider myself a climber, more of a trekker. Although I've done the basics and winter snow/ice courses. Bit too old to start doing the hard/high stuff anyway.

I plan on visiting K2 and the Baltoro at some point in the future just to visit.
 
  • 1Like
Reactions: Dr.Retarded

Screamfeeder

The Dirtbag
<Banned>
13,309
11,199
51d 10h 31m
That adds bulk, enough that I think the Jetboil size is a wash. It's big, but not so big. And you don't have to carry pots. And I've never had an issue with it being fragile. What parts of it do you find are fragile?

The one my friend was using had bits of the plastic bottom chipped off. From what you describe I am going to assume he threw it off a fucking mountain or something, so maybe it's not as fragile as I thought. It just felt...thin in my hands. He swears by it. As for bulk with pots, here is my two person setup packed and unpacked.

Dmjjnpo.jpg
g0NSWTv.jpg


I can make it even smaller and lighter with just the stove and a single camp cup. Only issue I have is that I have to use the smaller ISO cans but if I'm only cooking for myself or two it hasn't been an issue yet. I also have a much larger set of pots, plates etc for being fancy when not in the backcountry.

Maybe I'm just a snob about the way the Jetboil looks. It seems so...Flash...

But give me the best options you have for fall camping in Montana, and for summer camping in Utah. I'm looking at all the options. I'd love to have 2 or 3 bags for everyone, but that gets expensive.

You sound like a perfect candidate for The One. It's not ideal for going ultralight or for long through hikes, but it is an incredibly solid bag for multi-temp environments. It's 4lbs and change so it's heavy and it doesn't compress down super small but you basically get two full bags plus a camp blanket that all together range from 40/20/5 temps. I've only used it once in temps around 5/0 and I still had to layer up a bit to be cozy but that's the case with any bag in that temp. It has a TON of zippers and can be a bit confusing to figure out how to quickly assemble it all so I don't recommend it for trips where you want to get your camp up and going fast.

if you need something a little different, I cannot recommend the REI Magma bags highly enough. I have both the 10 and the 30 and they are both awesome. They compress down to about the size of two fists, are very light and decently comfortable. I will say the Magma 10 isn't QUITE accurate because at temps around 15-10 I was pretty chilly without layering up, but it's just so goddamn light and tiny I still use it.

I just looked and it seems REI changed the 10 model and now only does a 15. I haven't used that one but it looks like the 10 is no longer available. Bummer.

I would suggest you check out The One though. Sounds almost purpose built for you.

On a separate matter, we'd like to visit friends in Colorado for Thanksgiving. We don't want to fly, we don't want to stay in hotels, camping is iffy that time of year. We're thinking of renting an RV. Has anyone done this? Is this something that is feasible?
I've never done the RV rental thing but a few of my ski buddies do it once every few years around the Rockies and love it.
 

Screamfeeder

The Dirtbag
<Banned>
13,309
11,199
51d 10h 31m
Let's just say I will NEVER underpack water again in the desert.
People always underestimate water use in the desert, especially the high desert. I've done it a few times and it SUCKS. Nothing worse than coming to a dried up water source with half a liter left in your pack.

It made for a helluva adventure and it was with my childhood best friend who I hadn't spent time with in 20 years. Now we're making plans to bag Wheeler Peak in NM to get another "highest point in X state" under our belts. Anyone here done Wheeler Peak?

I've done Wheeler 3 times via the different routes. The easiest (and maybe best looking) route is the Lake Williams Trail that leaves from just outside Taos Ski Valley. If you do go there, make sure to do the short detour over to the Lake. It's shallow and no fish, but it's a cool spot. Depending on what time of year, make sure your ass is NOT up there in the late afternoon. You will get stuck by lightning.

I've done highest points in almost all the western states (looking at you Kings Peak) but for some reason I have never been out to Guadalupe. Being from NM we have a thing about pretending Texas just doesn't exist. That looks amazing though!
 
Last edited:

TheBeagle

Free Speech Extremist
7,350
20,662
107d 19h 4m
People always underestimate water use in the desert, especially the high desert. I've done it a few times and it SUCKS. Nothing worse than coming to a dried up water source with half a liter left in your pack.



I've done Wheeler 3 times via the different routes. The easiest (and maybe best looking) route is the Lake Williams Trail that leaves from just outside Taos Ski Valley. If you do go there, make sure to do the short detour over to the Lake. It's shallow and no fish, but it's a cool spot. Depending on what time of year, make sure your ass is NOT up there in the late afternoon. You will get stuck by lightning.

I've done highest points in almost all the western states (looking at you Kings Peak) but for some reason I have never been out to Guadalupe. Being from NM we have a thing aboutt pretending Texas just doesn't exist. That looks amazing though!

Have you done Borah and Granite (ID and MT)? Borah has Chicken Out Ridge that you have to tackle and Granite is pretty much a two day minimum. I've done neither but after Wheeler, are next on the list. Problem is my knees are 47 years old and I can't walk straight for a week after a summit hike.
 

Screamfeeder

The Dirtbag
<Banned>
13,309
11,199
51d 10h 31m
Have you done Borah and Granite (ID and MT)? Borah has Chicken Out Ridge that you have to tackle and Granite is pretty much a two day minimum. I've done neither but after Wheeler, are next on the list. Problem is my knees are 47 years old and I can't walk straight for a week after a summit hike.
I did Borah years ago ('07) and remember it being a pretty easy climb. Chicken Out Ridge is bigger than it looks in pictures and is basically just a rock scramble. You get a bunch of people hanging out there which makes it more dangerous than it needs to be. I'd say the saddle near the nose is much more difficult.

Granite I have not done! That one requires a bit of full on mountaineering and I am limited in people I can go with for that stuff. I may end up doing a small trip out that way in a year or two. Thanks for the depressing reminder.

I did Gannett WAY back in the day and it was a brute even for my much younger self. I've heard from numerous people that Granite is easier. Gannett was I think a full 7 day trip on the Glacier Trail from the east and unless I'm getting it confused with a similar trip to Grand Teton, the weather was fucking terrible. Bagged it though!
 
  • 1Like
Reactions: TheBeagle

Screamfeeder

The Dirtbag
<Banned>
13,309
11,199
51d 10h 31m
I grew up doing a lot of camping. Many a summer swamp ass in florida. Very brutal camping in fla summers. I do travel a lot and love minimalism. I always aim for the lightest and tightest as far as backpacking goes. I use the hell out of these REI compression bags. Love them.

Those are nice. I love how REI shit over the last few years has started to get better and better. My favorite compression sack has to be the Hoboroll. 3 liter larger size than the REI one for almost exactly the same weight. It's a bit bulky when loaded up but it holds basically all my shit that isn't needed for quick access.

Also kinda random but I'd highly recommend ex officio underwear. Found it many years ago when I first started backpacking/travel. Shit absorbs smell so good. Screamfeeder Screamfeeder random but have you tried ex officio? Not sure if it's as big in the camping world as it is in airplane backpacking/travel.
I'm all Smartwool. I know a few dudes that rock those ExOfficio boxer briefs though. I've never seen a reason to switch from Smartwool though.
 
  • 1Like
Reactions: Foler

lurkingdirk

A Dirk who Lurks
<Medals Crew>
22,521
36,082
128d 33m
The one my friend was using had bits of the plastic bottom chipped off. From what you describe I am going to assume he threw it off a fucking mountain or something, so maybe it's not as fragile as I thought. It just felt...thin in my hands. He swears by it. As for bulk with pots, here is my two person setup packed and unpacked.

Dmjjnpo.jpg
g0NSWTv.jpg


I can make it even smaller and lighter with just the stove and a single camp cup. Only issue I have is that I have to use the smaller ISO cans but if I'm only cooking for myself or two it hasn't been an issue yet. I also have a much larger set of pots, plates etc for being fancy when not in the backcountry.

Maybe I'm just a snob about the way the Jetboil looks. It seems so...Flash...



You sound like a perfect candidate for The One. It's not ideal for going ultralight or for long through hikes, but it is an incredibly solid bag for multi-temp environments. It's 4lbs and change so it's heavy and it doesn't compress down super small but you basically get two full bags plus a camp blanket that all together range from 40/20/5 temps. I've only used it once in temps around 5/0 and I still had to layer up a bit to be cozy but that's the case with any bag in that temp. It has a TON of zippers and can be a bit confusing to figure out how to quickly assemble it all so I don't recommend it for trips where you want to get your camp up and going fast.

if you need something a little different, I cannot recommend the REI Magma bags highly enough. I have both the 10 and the 30 and they are both awesome. They compress down to about the size of two fists, are very light and decently comfortable. I will say the Magma 10 isn't QUITE accurate because at temps around 15-10 I was pretty chilly without layering up, but it's just so goddamn light and tiny I still use it.

I just looked and it seems REI changed the 10 model and now only does a 15. I haven't used that one but it looks like the 10 is no longer available. Bummer.

I would suggest you check out The One though. Sounds almost purpose built for you.

I've never done the RV rental thing but a few of my ski buddies do it once every few years around the Rockies and love it.

Thanks man, solid advice all around. I like your stove/pots set up, too.
 

CaughtCross

Trakanon Raider
1,102
912
135d 9h 46m
Awesome pictures! I've done Rainer but via the much easier (and way more crowded) Disappointment route. My ice skills are sorely lacking and with COVID and possibly more fires, all the training I was planning on doing in the Sierras this year is put on hold.

Denali is a huge step up and on my list as well.

Denali would be an adventure. What is holding you back?

My ice skills are lacking too. Thought I was pretty good but North Ridge of Mount Baker really tested them and challenged me. Even got the screaming barfies and was literally screaming in pain at one belay stop for a few minutes Why You Want to Scream and Barf During a Cold Workout

Plan on making some trips out to Oray Ice Park to get in more ice climbing practice at some point. Just hard to get good at ice climbing living in California.
 

Screamfeeder

The Dirtbag
<Banned>
13,309
11,199
51d 10h 31m
Plan on making some trips out to Oray Ice Park to get in more ice climbing practice at some point. Just hard to get good at ice climbing living in California.
Oh shit Ouray is one of my favorite places! First place my girl and I took a trip to. Did the Bear Creek Trail and had terrible (but still delicious) steaks at Outlaw. I know the Ice Park is pretty famous but I've never been.

Nothing really holding me back from a Denali trip other than my own skills, my buddies being unable to (I'm not paying someone else 10k for shit I already know or have) and the fact that I think all permits are closed. It's in the cards before I'm 50. Calander year Triple Crown before 45 is going to be the harder goal me thinks.
 
  • 2Like
Reactions: Dr.Retarded and Foler

Foler

Forum Martyr
<Gold Donor>
20,223
17,899
Those are nice. I love how REI shit over the last few years has started to get better and better. My favorite compression sack has to be the Hoboroll. 3 liter larger size than the REI one for almost exactly the same weight. It's a bit bulky when loaded up but it holds basically all my shit that isn't needed for quick access.

I'm all Smartwool. I know a few dudes that rock those ExOfficio boxer briefs though. I've never seen a reason to switch from Smartwool though.
Never tried smartwool for underwear. I've always rocked them for socks when travel/camping.
 

Screamfeeder

The Dirtbag
<Banned>
13,309
11,199
51d 10h 31m
For anyone looking to help out with recovery and assistance in the west during the fires, or if you are just bored at home, please check out
&
 
  • 1Thoughts & Prayers
Reactions: Foler

Foler

Forum Martyr
<Gold Donor>
20,223
17,899
Not sure where to put this. Does anyone have a rec on good camping or lawn chairs? Shit gets crazy expensive like yeti wanting $300...

I'm looking to buy quite a few for when guests come over so IDEALLY under $100 a pop.
 

Borzak

Karazhan Raider
20,533
23,709
179d 10h 5m
No help. But old style lawn chairs have gotten stupid expensive. People strip off the stuff and sell just the frame and people put in new strapping. I haven't had much luck with any that fold up you put in a bag. They're heavy and don't last all that long. But it's all you can buy nowdays. BYOC. Bring your own chair lol.
 

lurkingdirk

A Dirk who Lurks
<Medals Crew>
22,521
36,082
128d 33m
Camping...chairs? If you're going to car camp, just get something like this:

If you're hiking in, don't get chairs. Sit on the ground. On a log. On your sleeping bag. But who needs chairs when camping? You're roughing it, man.
 
  • 1Like
Reactions: Dr.Retarded

Guurn

<Bronze Donator>
2,251
10,178
98d 23h 7m
I do the BWCA every other year roughly and my buddies and I go on a week long hiking trip every year. I'm also doing a pieced out hike of the superior hiking trail. My first leg was 4 days of rain but I still made about 70 miles.

My advice, when you look at anything for whatever you are doing look at the people who do it a lot and focus your money on the things they do. For example, I used to use a REI single person tent for my hikes. It was lightweight, easy to set up, and pretty bomber. No good hikers used it and I wondered why. After 4 days in the rain I understood. You can't set it up in the rain without everything getting soaked unless you use a tarp. Tarps are needless weight, they can be worth the weight however. I switched to a Tarptent double rainbow and rain is now manageable... Unless it is pouring, then you need the tarp. Super lightweight tarps are expensive and so are good tents. Worth the money.

They also spend money on shoes, those are subjective to some degree so I won't say what I use but most big hikers use trail runners instead of boots now.

I guess the lesson really is... Spend money on your hobby. It's always worth it.

A picture from my last BWCA trip with my son.

20190621_065758_HDR.jpg
 

Guurn

<Bronze Donator>
2,251
10,178
98d 23h 7m
Ok, I have a nice bourbon next to me and screamfeeder asked for stories, so here's one.

When my son was young I made a concerted effort to get to the BWCA. We always brought friends and I always did all the planning. He was 11 at the time and a confident little guy. Quick to laugh and not a wuss when times got tough. He'd just look angry, tell you his opinion and move on. Great kid. We had my wife's sister, two of my friends and one of their kids along.

The trip started beautiful and rough as the BWCA is prone to doing. Gorgeous entry, a slow moving grassy steam with a couple of pull overs and short rocky portages to break up the sitting. I planned well. My buddy Bill (his real name) bought a new kevlar canoe for the trip (we rented) and custom wooden oars to go along with it. Todd and Kim's canoe was a brand new kevlar rental.

There are portents, in this case on one of the rocky portages. Bill set his custom beavertail paddle down and proceeded to fall off balance, step on it, and break it in half. $325 gone and used less than a day. Shortly thereafter it started to pour. We weren't that worried since we were one lake and one 60 rod portage away. Wet rocks are slippery. The other canoe my friend Todd was driving took a dive during a portage onto the sharp rocks. What was a shiny new rental kevlar now had a deep ding and several bad scrapes. We pushed on. After finally arriving at our destination lake we found both camping locations were full. Hindsight being what it is I should have known better. It's a perfect place for teenagers to screw and drink. That's who was there. So we moved on. We were now about 5 hours in, 2 of them in strong rain. The next portage and lake was promising. The first campsite was taken leaving one last shot. Lady luck seems to find me sometimes and she was with me that day. It was open and in good shape. There is a tradition in the BWCA of leaving a pile of chopped wood for the next group and a sprig of pine on the grill. This camp was no exception. The issue being, of course, we were soaked and so was all of the wood. No fires were had that night. We were decidedly cold but the kids were good about it. Truthfully I was worried, we were about one mild mistake from having to leave. One wet sleeping bag, one more broken paddle etc etc.

The next morning.

Anyone that camps knows how amazing sunshine feels after a wet night. It picks you up instantly. But we were in northern Minnesota at a campsite I hadn't scouted. Naturally it backed up to a swamp and with the sun came the mosquitoes. We aren't rookies to those but sometimes they seem particularly desperate. Even though he worked along with everyone, reading my child's mood on his face was easy, it was time to move. I suggested it and the adults agreed. We would take advantage of the sun, paddle along a huge lake (roughly 6 miles long about 1 mile wide) and camp on an island. Off we went, trying to find peace, and peace we found. 75, sunny in a huge lake and zero wind. You can only hope to remember it well enough. You could see fish swimming along the bottom of the lake clear as... Clear water? Lol

Along we went, in no hurry. Stopping once for fun and then back on our way. Without warning the wind came up. Strong wind. Within minutes we went from glass to 4 foot swells. I know that doesn't sound like much, but we were in heavily laden canoes. My son suggested sticking a little closer to the shoreline, so we stayed about 50 yards out. Along came a wave, a rogue wave about 5' high, it just carried us in towards shore. It set is down gently after about 20 yards on a huge flat sloped rock and we rolled into the drink.

At first you swim. Then you look for your kid. Then you look at the packs floating around you and lastly you try to stand. That's just how it goes. I found I could stand, my son was standing and the packs were floating. I had the canoe. But something was wrong, he was crying... Hard. Really hard. I hadn't heard that from him for probably 7 years at that point. Then your mind races before you can get the words out. He looks fine what could possibly be wrong? So I asked in a loud voice to be heard over the wind and waves. I think it shocked him. His response was simple and unexpected... Are we going to starve? Wtf. We didn't have the food, there other canoes did and they were fine. I could see them. So I asked, why would you think we are going to starve. "I dunno, the idea just scared me". Kids. I spent the next 15 minutes putting him to work getting loaded back up and getting us going to get his mind off of that idea. We made it to the island, barely. He fished for a day straight. I suppose to this day he doesn't remember that, probably a subconscious response to his fear.

I learned more lessons on that trip than any other. The tough trips, I don't want to call them bad because they aren't, are the ones that make you better. Sometimes they reveal unexpected problems and sometimes hidden fears.

Time for a plug. The canoe that was a brand new rental and came back looking like the one you won't buy used even if it was a bargain. We were ready to have to justifiably pay big money to the outfitters. We wouldn't have batted an eye if he said $600 in repair costs. At our outfitters, Bear Track in Grand Marais, the owner took one look at it and said he'd indeed have to charge us for it. How did $30 sound? We couldn't pay him fast enough. I use them to this day. Honesty at the end of a rough trip was refreshing and probably part of the reason my memories keep driving me back to enjoy that beautiful, dreadful, annoying, and relaxing place again and again.