College

Noodleface

A Mod Real Quick
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14,508
After 7 years why would anyone look at your schooling?

I think IT is a little different than engineering in at least the sense that the barrier for entry is a bit different. If he was thinking something IT, I would consider stopping at associates and looking. I also left school with nearly 2 years of experience, which is nothing to shake a stick at. Also, engineering degrees are pimp status. You'll feel smarter than 98% of the population and probably make more too.
 

Soriak_sl

shitlord
783
0
It's not debt so much, but the time investment. I'm middle aged and going back to retrain, so on one hand I'm torn between getting back to work as soon as possible while knowing that if I pass up going all out on college now that I probably won't get another opportunity. And these AS degrees and certs will prob take me 2 1/2 years as it is already, and I'm trying to wrap my head around the fact that so far it looks like I'll have to take more than another two years for an EE, it might quite possibly end up being 3 or so.
Has the application deadline for transfer students at most colleges passed yet? Don't worry about completing your AS if you can transfer to a BS program, the latter supersedes the former. I would definitely aim for the best ranked program you can qualify for, though. It does make a big difference. If that means taking on some debt for (modest) living expenses, that's not a big deal.

If the deadline has passed, start preparing for next fall. Also make sure to reach out to universities and see what might transfer. Harvey Mudd, Carnegie Mellon, MIT, Stanford -- I presume you can think of other schools. Might as well aim high. Don't worry about sticker price as schools of that caliber tend to have good financial aid available. Then aim for the top state institutions. You don't want to be cheap on application fees, because institutional rank does make a difference and an extra $100 averaged over your future income is pretty close to nothing.

Study for the SAT and ace the math section in particular. This is probably not going to be too difficult for you now that you have more of a math and engineering background. Still, make sure you have enough time to retake it once. Scores of those who retake tests tend to be significantly higher the second time around.

WAT

I'm doing part time at the CC through FAFSA, IIRC, think that's $8. Mind you I can work when I can fit it in, it's tax free and the instructors treat me extremely well, but still....lol.
We have Google and Pixar right next door picking up the undergraduates who survive the intro programming sequence. In that case, it literally means surviving the class... during the period when they have group projects going on, you see people napping and coding in shifts 24/7.
 

Falstaff

Ahn'Qiraj Raider
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This thread depresses me because I wish I could go back in time and do it all over again.

Regardless, I'll be cheering for you Erronius.
 

Lemmiwinks_sl

shitlord
533
6
The dropout rate for engineering students is almost hilarious.. big dreams fall hard
So true. Im in an engineering program which is ranked in the top 5 in the nation (Nuclear engineering), and its funny how classes thin out. Cal 1 = 150 students, cal 2 = 100 students, cal 3 = 75 students, diff eq...20 students.

So many EEs/CS majors on this board but thats not surprising I guess. Wheres all the mech/chem guys?

I worked in IT full time from 18-21, then went back to school, after being a literal failure in high school. Too much EQ (lol). I think i graduated HS at like 1200/1500 ranking. Never took the SAT. Went to community college, took chem 1/2, physics and all that jazz, and got a 3.8, and I got into a top 5 ranked program. You can do it man, just study your ass off.

Dont worry about the student debt. If you can get by with a 3.0 through college with an engineering degree, rack up at least one internship during the summer, youll be set. Youll get the loans paid off quick.
 

Rajaah

Honorable Member
<Gold Donor>
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Reviving this thread because I've got Stuff Goin On.

So basically I've been back and forth about taking my school's accelerated RN program to get a nursing degree in one year.

Finally decided to go for it. Went there to sign up, found out that it's a competitive entry field where they only choose X amount of applicants per year. Based on your prior GPA, your essay, probably your race, and whether you already have a bachelor's or not. I've got a bachelor's and wouldn't have any trouble writing a bang-up essay. However I'm probably at a disadvantage due to whiteness, and GPA is mediocre. I graduated in 2015 with a 3.04 or so, which is pretty crap. I was severely burned out by the end of 2013 though and hung on for another couple of semesters, getting a lot of C's for those last bunch. Figured it might bite me at some point.

So I'm not sure if they'll even take me for the accelerated RN program. I need to also do 6 or so pre-requisite classes first to even be considered (and they might still reject me). Will probably have to pay out of pocket for those since I don't think financial aid covers non-degree courses. So that's Problem 1. Do I want to go back and spend 1 to 1 and a half semesters doing expensive pre-reqs that might amount to nothing? On the bright side, it's possible I'll be able to get financial aid to cover it, gonna look into it. Don't want to go too much in debt, but even if it's like 50% it'll cushion the hit.

Now, Problem 2: I've discovered that my transcript is totally F'd up. While I was there, they printed it out to look at and see how well I qualified for the RN program. I took a semester off late in college (due to aforementioned burnout) to recharge and then finish things out. I don't know how this happened, but apparently I wasn't actually withdrawn from courses that semester, and have FIVE F'S on the transcript for it, bringing my GPA down to 2.58 according to the one they printed out.

This is super weird because I graduated 7 years ago and have read my transcript (the one I got right after graduating) a bunch of times before. But now when I go get one from the school, it has this new semester added with all these F's, like some kind of Mandela Effect weirdness. Maybe someone went back and fooled with my file. I don't know if it was added later or if I somehow didn't see it while reading past transcripts. I'd need to dig up my actual physical transcript copy to find out.

So Problem 2: I need to re-take the five F courses to undo those bad grades and bump the GPA back up to 3, hopefully. However since it's been so long, not sure if they'll let me. They'll probably also wonder how I never noticed this over seven years. Maybe if I go to the dean of students and whoever it is is sympathetic, they can pull some strings and help me out.

Ideally, I go back for 2-3 semesters and knock off the F's then the pre-reqs, then apply to the RN program. Even this best-case scenario is going to be expensive and time-consuming. Success is probably doable. At the very least I want to get the F's knocked off and the GPA restored on general principle. Or maybe I should just leave it all alone, take my bachelor's degree and be happy, and just be a loser with a 2.58.

What would you do?

TY, God bless.
 

Aevian

Silver Knight of the Realm
241
54
Reviving this thread because I've got Stuff Goin On.

So basically I've been back and forth about taking my school's accelerated RN program to get a nursing degree in one year.

Finally decided to go for it. Went there to sign up, found out that it's a competitive entry field where they only choose X amount of applicants per year. Based on your prior GPA, your essay, probably your race, and whether you already have a bachelor's or not. I've got a bachelor's and wouldn't have any trouble writing a bang-up essay. However I'm probably at a disadvantage due to whiteness, and GPA is mediocre. I graduated in 2015 with a 3.04 or so, which is pretty crap. I was severely burned out by the end of 2013 though and hung on for another couple of semesters, getting a lot of C's for those last bunch. Figured it might bite me at some point.

So I'm not sure if they'll even take me for the accelerated RN program. I need to also do 6 or so pre-requisite classes first to even be considered (and they might still reject me). Will probably have to pay out of pocket for those since I don't think financial aid covers non-degree courses. So that's Problem 1. Do I want to go back and spend 1 to 1 and a half semesters doing expensive pre-reqs that might amount to nothing? On the bright side, it's possible I'll be able to get financial aid to cover it, gonna look into it. Don't want to go too much in debt, but even if it's like 50% it'll cushion the hit.

Now, Problem 2: I've discovered that my transcript is totally F'd up. While I was there, they printed it out to look at and see how well I qualified for the RN program. I took a semester off late in college (due to aforementioned burnout) to recharge and then finish things out. I don't know how this happened, but apparently I wasn't actually withdrawn from courses that semester, and have FIVE F'S on the transcript for it, bringing my GPA down to 2.58 according to the one they printed out.

This is super weird because I graduated 7 years ago and have read my transcript (the one I got right after graduating) a bunch of times before. But now when I go get one from the school, it has this new semester added with all these F's, like some kind of Mandela Effect weirdness. Maybe someone went back and fooled with my file. I don't know if it was added later or if I somehow didn't see it while reading past transcripts. I'd need to dig up my actual physical transcript copy to find out.

So Problem 2: I need to re-take the five F courses to undo those bad grades and bump the GPA back up to 3, hopefully. However since it's been so long, not sure if they'll let me. They'll probably also wonder how I never noticed this over seven years. Maybe if I go to the dean of students and whoever it is is sympathetic, they can pull some strings and help me out.

Ideally, I go back for 2-3 semesters and knock off the F's then the pre-reqs, then apply to the RN program. Even this best-case scenario is going to be expensive and time-consuming. Success is probably doable. At the very least I want to get the F's knocked off and the GPA restored on general principle. Or maybe I should just leave it all alone, take my bachelor's degree and be happy, and just be a loser with a 2.58.

What would you do?

TY, God bless.

I'm happy to give you some of my thoughts. I work as a director in a hospital group, various different roles in healthcare the past 10 years. A few questions for you, what is your reason for getting your RN? Are you wanting to do outpatient clinic work, hospital side, or some sort of administrative work that requires RN licensure? Are you currently working in the medical field? Are you insistent on doing the accelerated program for specific reason? Getting into higher paying role asap or just don't want to be in school for a long time?
 

Volto!

Lord Nagafen Raider
412
333
Reviving this thread because I've got Stuff Goin On.

So basically I've been back and forth about taking my school's accelerated RN program to get a nursing degree in one year.

Finally decided to go for it. Went there to sign up, found out that it's a competitive entry field where they only choose X amount of applicants per year. Based on your prior GPA, your essay, probably your race, and whether you already have a bachelor's or not. I've got a bachelor's and wouldn't have any trouble writing a bang-up essay. However I'm probably at a disadvantage due to whiteness, and GPA is mediocre. I graduated in 2015 with a 3.04 or so, which is pretty crap. I was severely burned out by the end of 2013 though and hung on for another couple of semesters, getting a lot of C's for those last bunch. Figured it might bite me at some point.

So I'm not sure if they'll even take me for the accelerated RN program. I need to also do 6 or so pre-requisite classes first to even be considered (and they might still reject me). Will probably have to pay out of pocket for those since I don't think financial aid covers non-degree courses. So that's Problem 1. Do I want to go back and spend 1 to 1 and a half semesters doing expensive pre-reqs that might amount to nothing? On the bright side, it's possible I'll be able to get financial aid to cover it, gonna look into it. Don't want to go too much in debt, but even if it's like 50% it'll cushion the hit.

Now, Problem 2: I've discovered that my transcript is totally F'd up. While I was there, they printed it out to look at and see how well I qualified for the RN program. I took a semester off late in college (due to aforementioned burnout) to recharge and then finish things out. I don't know how this happened, but apparently I wasn't actually withdrawn from courses that semester, and have FIVE F'S on the transcript for it, bringing my GPA down to 2.58 according to the one they printed out.

This is super weird because I graduated 7 years ago and have read my transcript (the one I got right after graduating) a bunch of times before. But now when I go get one from the school, it has this new semester added with all these F's, like some kind of Mandela Effect weirdness. Maybe someone went back and fooled with my file. I don't know if it was added later or if I somehow didn't see it while reading past transcripts. I'd need to dig up my actual physical transcript copy to find out.

So Problem 2: I need to re-take the five F courses to undo those bad grades and bump the GPA back up to 3, hopefully. However since it's been so long, not sure if they'll let me. They'll probably also wonder how I never noticed this over seven years. Maybe if I go to the dean of students and whoever it is is sympathetic, they can pull some strings and help me out.

Ideally, I go back for 2-3 semesters and knock off the F's then the pre-reqs, then apply to the RN program. Even this best-case scenario is going to be expensive and time-consuming. Success is probably doable. At the very least I want to get the F's knocked off and the GPA restored on general principle. Or maybe I should just leave it all alone, take my bachelor's degree and be happy, and just be a loser with a 2.58.

What would you do?

TY, God bless.
One thing to keep in mind: Some classes are only ‘good’ for ~5 years depending on the nursing program. For example, if you took statistics seven years ago, you may have to take it again so the prerequisite was completed within five years of you starting the program. You should also try to get a sense as to whether the classes you need are typically impacted and waitlisted, i.e. you may not get the classes you want unless you have some kind of priority registration, which you probably don’t.

It’s hard to give any real advice because this decision is ultimately about how you value your time. If you are interested in the field, don’t have better career prospects for now, and especially if you are single/no kids, I’d say you have nothing to lose but a lot to gain. But it will take time. I had to make an almost identical decision when I was in my mid to late 20s about going back to a JC after finishing college, taking prereqs, and getting into nursing. It was a great choice for me. I hope this helps.
 

Rajaah

Honorable Member
<Gold Donor>
11,110
14,738
I'm happy to give you some of my thoughts. I work as a director in a hospital group, various different roles in healthcare the past 10 years. A few questions for you, what is your reason for getting your RN? Are you wanting to do outpatient clinic work, hospital side, or some sort of administrative work that requires RN licensure? Are you currently working in the medical field? Are you insistent on doing the accelerated program for specific reason? Getting into higher paying role asap or just don't want to be in school for a long time?

It was a long-time dream of mine to be a doctor, but I went to school for writing instead. The 10-12 year commitment (and costs) felt prohibitive for being a doctor, especially considering I started college late (age 26). The funny thing is, if I'd just gone ahead and done it, I'd probably be finished now (age 39). So I'm not in the field at all.

Several of my relatives are nurses. They've revived my interest in the medical field with their stories of being traveling nurses. Around here, nurses make around $80/hr which would be a substantial increase over what I make currently (roughly $40/hr).

Ideally I'd like to do hospital work locally, but also go on excursions as a traveling nurse and spend time in places like Florida and Alaska.

The accelerated program is just a way to get it done faster. At this juncture I'll do it the long way if I have to though. The same program, non-accelerated, is 3 years at my school (really, 3 and a half with pre-reqs). I think there's also an application process for that. And factor in wanting to undo my previous mistake-generated F's...I'm looking at a few years. Maybe I can slot those in as electives and kill two birds with one stone.

If you are interested in the field, don’t have better career prospects for now, and especially if you are single/no kids, I’d say you have nothing to lose but a lot to gain. But it will take time. I had to make an almost identical decision when I was in my mid to late 20s about going back to a JC after finishing college, taking prereqs, and getting into nursing. It was a great choice for me. I hope this helps.

Good call. I'm single/no kids, somehow. Figured I would have been long-since married by 39, but I ended up being a lone wolf most of the time and playing the field. So I'm not really beholden to anybody. Nothing to lose except time, but like I said, if I'd just done it before (instead of fretting about time) I'd have been done a while ago.
 

Sanrith Descartes

Veteran of a thousand threadban wars
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I don't know shit about RN programs so cant comment on that. I will say that if you burned out during a bachelors in writing, maybe the accelerated program isnt the best choice. I did ky MBA on an accelerated pace. Its not for everyone. Depending on the field there can be a fuckton of material absorption that may not be fun at half the normal time.

If you really want to do it for a career, take the extra year so you remove that stress of the accelerated program. Also it eliminates the time involved retaking 5 classes to wipe out the Fs so its pretty much a wash.
 
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Aevian

Silver Knight of the Realm
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54
Travel nursing can be a pretty huge pay for assignments. Keep in mind that most of those jobs require like a year experience before a recruiter will put you in that role. New grad working hospital side will be less than what you make currently even if you are getting shift differentials, etc. so keep that in mind as well. I'd look into your employer to see if they offer some sort of tuition reimbursement. If you work in healthcare, there are some employers that will have agreements with some schools for lower costs. But, I have no idea what your work history is like so I'm not sure what kind of job you could land in healthcare without taking a huge pay cut. Could be something to consider though as you can really see what it's like working there. And then also get an idea of what type of nursing work you want to do. Most travel assignments are ICU, but you might find you want to do CRNA which pays extremely well. Or you may decide you want to get your DNP eventually and have your "own" practice.


When I went to college after high school, I ended up withdrawing because I was lazy and wasn't sure of what I wanted to do. I went back to school in my late 30s to finish my bachelor's while working at a hospital. I did 12 hours a semester and I was miserable. This was also me working during the pandemic at a hospital. If you were burnt out back then, I think an accelerated program may be too much to take on. I would take your time with this, take advantage of tuition reimbursement if time isn't a huge concern of yours.
 
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My strat
  • Make sure this program is the best bang for your buck. Reputability of program must be absolutely top notch. You will see later why.
  • Find someone you respect already doing what you want to do, ask them about how to get this part done, tricks, etc. Offer to pay for lunch. A couple lunches. LEARN.
  • Double-check to make sure you are ready for "combat mode". This specific strat only works if you excel. You want to maximize your lift power at launch.
  • After you complete the education and have your certification, etc., go WHEREVER the max opportunity / job is.
  • Do not squander the fresh period when you start out, getting pigeonholed as a local!
  • Let it be known you are mobile and willing to move. Do this as soon as the opportunity presents itself.
  • Show up early every day.
  • If tensions arise, never ever tell your supervisor, or even a co-worker something like, "I have given so much to this company..." You work hard because that is who you are, period. You can destroy a decade of reputation by acting like a whiny bitch one single day. Complain about the company and its policies: never complain about your treatment.
  • If following these rules do not create a job with promise, move on the second it is clear. Never smoke hopium. If these strats do not work, it's a bad job. Good companies will luv you.
 

zzeris

King Turd of Shit Hill
<Gold Donor>
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It was a long-time dream of mine to be a doctor, but I went to school for writing instead. The 10-12 year commitment (and costs) felt prohibitive for being a doctor, especially considering I started college late (age 26). The funny thing is, if I'd just gone ahead and done it, I'd probably be finished now (age 39). So I'm not in the field at all.

Several of my relatives are nurses. They've revived my interest in the medical field with their stories of being traveling nurses. Around here, nurses make around $80/hr which would be a substantial increase over what I make currently (roughly $40/hr).

Ideally I'd like to do hospital work locally, but also go on excursions as a traveling nurse and spend time in places like Florida and Alaska.

The accelerated program is just a way to get it done faster. At this juncture I'll do it the long way if I have to though. The same program, non-accelerated, is 3 years at my school (really, 3 and a half with pre-reqs). I think there's also an application process for that. And factor in wanting to undo my previous mistake-generated F's...I'm looking at a few years. Maybe I can slot those in as electives and kill two birds with one stone.



Good call. I'm single/no kids, somehow. Figured I would have been long-since married by 39, but I ended up being a lone wolf most of the time and playing the field. So I'm not really beholden to anybody. Nothing to lose except time, but like I said, if I'd just done it before (instead of fretting about time) I'd have been done a while ago.

Bro, first off there is a desperate need for nurses and you fit one criterion that is important. You are older and have a good work history. Most youth today want to be like our WFH programmers and never leave the house to work. They also want easy money which is not nursing. That's fine for some jobs but not nursing obviously. Second, they love men. We are a rarity, and they love the ability to use us as pack animals for all the fat people. They are also horny women and you will get all the offers you want so be careful.

On the school side. the GPA is what they care about and there's usually a pre-test as well that, if you score well, they will want you. The schooling is easy, and no one gives a shit about something 7 years ago. Just make sure you hit the GPA. As a white person, you will be a later pick. If anyone throws around some BS, just ask if nursing has any bias for older people and if the school does as well. That will shut them up.

Nursing part. Hospitals will be begging for your services. If you like it, then travel nurse hospitals and make more money. You will find out what you like. I prefer mental health. I have a buddy making a killing in the prisons. Hospitals are desperate but ERs need experience if you want to do that later. Being single, you should really look into traveling. As long as you are flexible on your schedule and willing to put up with a lot of shit, you will make a shit ton of money and gets lots of crazy bitch pussy. My wife isn't prepared to travel yet and hates me being about crazy pussy so I don't travel right now but I will again in a little while. Just find what you like to do but I preferred it to trucking. You will find out during your schooling process if you like it. Ask the nurses you meet during clinicals about the field. They will let you know all of the negatives but some will also offer the positives.Enough rambling for one post. Good luck and let me know how it goes.

Edit- some places still require Covid shots so watch for that.
 
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