Geology, Earthquakes and Volcanos

Gravel

Golden Baron of the Realm
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Article about how the San Andreas is probably mostly dormant, and the real threat is Walker Lane (stretching along the eastern Sierras up to Tahoe).

It was written in April 2019, 3 months before the Ridgecrest quakes started. This year the Lunar Crater Lava Field (Tonopah, NV) has been quite active with a 6.5 quake hit last month.

 

Aldarion

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In theory couldn't a well stocked bunker in some other continent hold survivors for long enough? I have not read enough predictions about a Yellowstone eruption.
 
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moonarchia

The Scientific Shitlord
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In theory couldn't a well stocked bunker in some other continent hold survivors for long enough? I have not read enough predictions about a Yellowstone eruption.
No. The Yellowstone Caldera going off is an ELE straight up. The entire atmosphere will be gone along with instant forced realignment of all the continental shelves. There might be some microbes somewhere that live, but there will be no more humans.
 

chthonic-anemos

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Cybsled

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Yellowstone going off wouldn’t be an ELE in terms of a dinosaur or Permian-Triassic category ELE.

It would be very bad and cause 100s of millions of deaths long term, but’s its no worse than a full nuclear exchange between the US and Russia.
 

Phazael

Confirmed Beta Shitlord, Fat Bastard
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Actually it would be way worse because of the sulfur that would be ejected into the atmosphere in enormous quantities. Full nuke exchange would not blot out the sky to the extent that an eruption of that magnitude can. The largest detonation ever recorded in history was Krakatoa, several orders of magnitude more powerful than the biggest nuke ever set off. And that would be a firecracker compared to the Caldera. And thats not even getting into the tectonic aftershocks that would basically obliterate most land masses. Not even aquatic life would survive, because the oceans would be too poisoned with sulfur.

What makes it dangerous is that it is two flows that are relatively recent (geologically) and these things tend to get stronger each time they go off until they finally lose any magma pressure activity. The last time the Caldera blew it threw 340 cubic miles of rock into the air. Projections of the next possible eruption suggest a layer of ten feet of molten ash would drop a thousand miles in every direction, and thats just for starters. The first eruption in that area is pretty much why most living animals in north america had to migrate over from the asian land bridge and rained ash on over half of the continent.
 
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Siddar

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Really go look at the super volcanos video I posted people it all there. Caldera eruptions linked to yellow stone hot spot happen roughly once every every million years are so. It is caused by a hotspot just like the Hawaiian one that made those island. As near as can be determined there is no indication that hotspots ever burnout. They are a near permanent factor like the contents and probably more permanent actually. Contents pass over them and they cause caldera eruptions on land and less violent eruptions at sea generally because of the thickness of crust.

It not the end of the world if one goes off. It would be the end the world as we currently see it. But life and planet will survive just as it has during the thousand are so previous caldera eruptions.
 

Chukzombi

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Really go look at the super volcanos video I posted people it all there. Caldera eruptions linked to yellow stone hot spot happen roughly once every every million years are so. It is caused by a hotspot just like the Hawaiian one that made those island. As near as can be determined there is no indication that hotspots ever burnout. They are a near permanent factor like the contents and probably more permanent actually. Contents pass over them and they cause caldera eruptions on land and less violent eruptions at sea generally because of the thickness of crust.

It not the end of the world if one goes off. It would be the end the world as we currently see it. But life and planet will survive just as it has during the thousand are so previous caldera eruptions.
yes the planet and "life" would endure. thats really not saying much after the hundred or more years of a radiation cloud and maybe a few hundred thousand year ice age. there could be some fish chilling out under all that ice near a hot spring which could survive. but uh. thats it.
 
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Cybsled

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You're vastly overestimating the impact of such an eruption on a global scale. Yellowstone already has erupted in the past. In fact, in some cases so recently that humans were on the planet and larger mega eruptions when hominids were around. They've actually found geologic evidence of the ash zone. It literally covers like half the US and was over a meter thick hundreds of miles from the location. But keep in mind that it didn't cause any massive ELE of note. It's not like 90% of mammals or whatever went extinct.

Here's a historical context


Sulfur does fuck up the atmosphere to be sure. In fact, that is partially why the non-avian dinosaur killing asteroid was so bad...it struck directly on a location that released a FUCKLOAD of sulfur and put it high into the atmosphere. My old paleontology professor also theorized that it may have struck in the Spring due to studies of plant fossils, because the super acid rain would have fucked up plants bad and because they used all their energy to emerge for Spring, they were less able to recover in the subsequent years (which in turn fucked up the food chain and why pretty much most land species weighing more than 50 lbs went extinct).

The Siberia Magmatraps are also theorized to have heavily caused the Permian-Triassic extinction, in conjunction with asteroid impacts. That extinct event was one of the worst in history...like 90% of all life died on the planet.
 

Scoresby

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You're vastly overestimating the impact of such an eruption on a global scale. Yellowstone already has erupted in the past. In fact, in some cases so recently that humans were on the planet and larger mega eruptions when hominids were around. They've actually found geologic evidence of the ash zone. It literally covers like half the US and was over a meter thick hundreds of miles from the location. But keep in mind that it didn't cause any massive ELE of note. It's not like 90% of mammals or whatever went extinct.

Here's a historical context


Sulfur does fuck up the atmosphere to be sure. In fact, that is partially why the non-avian dinosaur killing asteroid was so bad...it struck directly on a location that released a FUCKLOAD of sulfur and put it high into the atmosphere. My old paleontology professor also theorized that it may have struck in the Spring due to studies of plant fossils, because the super acid rain would have fucked up plants bad and because they used all their energy to emerge for Spring, they were less able to recover in the subsequent years (which in turn fucked up the food chain and why pretty much most land species weighing more than 50 lbs went extinct).

The Siberia Magmatraps are also theorized to have heavily caused the Permian-Triassic extinction, in conjunction with asteroid impacts. That extinct event was one of the worst in history...like 90% of all life died on the planet.

Interesting theory regarding the Chicxulub impact occurring in Spring and how that might amplify the significance. Spring would only be for half of the world though, so peak bad might be Spring in the Southern Hemisphere with the general blastwave doing much of the nastiness in the Northern Hemisphere. Arbitrarily there's a 50% chance it was Spring somewhere on the planet though.
 

TheBeagle

Free Speech Extremist
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Anyone that still thinks nuclear winter would be a real thing hasn't been paying attention to how much we get lied to by "experts" and the media to keep us fearful. If a full nuclear exchange occured there would be lots of hot spots but a full blown global environmental apocalypse....no.

Krakatoa didn't do more than a mild cooling (possibly) for a year or two and it released 20 million tons of sulfur directly into the atmosphere. The third explosion alone was 200 megatons.