The Astronomy Thread

iannis

Chairman Meow
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Looks,like it's about that Hawaiian na med asteroid that they noticed.

People want to think it's rama.

Which is fine. Would be neat.

Probably just a weird shaped rock travelling at a weird angle. What's most amazing about it is that we were able to detect and track it.
 
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Kiroy

Marine Biologist
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Looks,like it's about that Hawaiian na med asteroid that they noticed.

People want to think it's rama.

Which is fine. Would be neat.

Probably just a weird shaped rock travelling at a weird angle. What's most amazing about it is that we were able to detect and track it.
The amount of acceleration is a mathimatical problem. If it wasn’t for that id have dismissed this all together.
 
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Ukerric

Bearded Ape
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This. It's essentially the "Ariane argument" (that probably cost the CEO his seat). Now that the F9 gets mostly refurbished all the time, multiple times, they don't need the full manufacturing teams.

I'm pretty sure nobody in the R&D got fired, and most of the launch teams are unaffected.
 

khorum

Get Raped
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Still the same issue as the VASIMR and other ion drives though. At 100kw per N, thats better thrust/kw ratio than the 200kw VASIMR prototype---but to get to mars faster than chemical drives it would need a 5megawatt nuclear reactor to produce the kilowatt-hours to win out. The VASIMR would need a 10MW. Neither technology yet exists for space.

Which isn't to say they can't. For comparison the new A1B reactors powering the Ford-class supercarriers are 700 MW each and they're both 24% smaller and more efficient than the older A4W reactors on the Nimitz class.