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TJT

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Guys, I need your help.

Recently I read The Phoenix Project because I'm stepping into a more management role in IT and I was blown away with how well practical technical teachings packaged into the shape of a novel worked for me. Looking back, this seems completely obvious, but never mind that.

Right now I'm looking for any books/series/genres that are similar to this setup. I realize that a lot of great literature is thought provoking and teaches about all kinds of topics on a more subtle level, but I'm really looking for something that has its lessons a bit more on the foreground. So the fiction itself doesn't have to be mindblowing, as long as the teachings it supports are solid.

The reason I'm asking you is that I've been looking around quite a bit and there is just so much out there that seems like it could be something, but I'm not sure. Because my time is really limited right now, I'm hesitant to just start buying books and experiment. As such, I'm looking for books of this type you would consider your absolute favorites. I'm interesting in pretty much any topics, but have a preference for academics and within that for philosophy, science and technology.
When it comes to practical skills like this I never got much out of books. The only technical skill book I really got something out of and enjoyed was this one.

 

Arbitrary

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Guys, I need your help.

Recently I read The Phoenix Project because I'm stepping into a more management role in IT and I was blown away with how well practical technical teachings packaged into the shape of a novel worked for me. Looking back, this seems completely obvious, but never mind that.

Right now I'm looking for any books/series/genres that are similar to this setup. I realize that a lot of great literature is thought provoking and teaches about all kinds of topics on a more subtle level, but I'm really looking for something that has its lessons a bit more on the foreground. So the fiction itself doesn't have to be mindblowing, as long as the teachings it supports are solid.

The reason I'm asking you is that I've been looking around quite a bit and there is just so much out there that seems like it could be something, but I'm not sure. Because my time is really limited right now, I'm hesitant to just start buying books and experiment. As such, I'm looking for books of this type you would consider your absolute favorites. I'm interesting in pretty much any topics, but have a preference for academics and within that for philosophy, science and technology.
I guess like Zero to One, Antifragile, Skin in the Game, The Drunkard's Walk and Talent is Overrated maybe?
 

Oblio

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I started the Dune Series, probably 1/3 of the way through the first book and I think it is great.

I remember seeing the movie as a kid and I thought it was boring especially compared to Star Wars. Then I saw the movie as an adult and thought, imagine what this could have been, what a missed opportunity. I am hyped for the new movie, so I decided to read the books and I pretty happy about it.
 

Regime

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I started the Dune Series, probably 1/3 of the way through the first book and I think it is great.

I remember seeing the movie as a kid and I thought it was boring especially compared to Star Wars. Then I saw the movie as an adult and thought, imagine what this could have been, what a missed opportunity. I am hyped for the new movie, so I decided to read the books and I pretty happy about it.
In for a treat. It is my favorite book.
 
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ver_21

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Just finished The Falcon of Sparta. It's a Conn Iggulden historical novel about Cyrus and Xenophon. To be honest, Iggulden's Genghis and Caesar series are all-around better reads, but Falcon is still a great introduction to the history and the author is a decent-enough writer. Xenophon is a pretty cool historical figure.

Aiming to read the Neopolitan Novels next. Chick books perhaps, but first two seasons of the show are so good, I have to try them.
 
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Kovaks

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Just finished The Girl and the Stars by Mark Lawrence. I enjoyed it, but I like all his books. Much like the Prince of Fools trilliogy expanded on world from the Thorns books and filled in allot of info about the setting, this looks like it will expand alot on the world he set up in the ancestor trilliogy. This really hits the spot for me since in most books I almost enjoy the world's and setting more than the characters so books that fill in setting questions are my favorite.

spoiler for Lawrence and Sanderson books
he appears to be working on a cosmere style universe similar to Sanderson where all his books are tied together through time, and maybe space, with a Hoid like reoccurring character in Taproot, who is scheming behind the scenes.
 
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Dynalisia

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I guess like Zero to One, Antifragile, Skin in the Game, The Drunkard's Walk and Talent is Overrated maybe?
These are great suggestions, but are (as far as I can see) books that are directly focused on explaining their topic. What I'm looking for are novels in which the character(s) experience(s) things that leads them to learn about a particular topic, and where the topic is a practical/technical/academic one (so not love, the meaning of life, personal development, etc.).
 

Ukerric

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Has anyone read Ford's stuff?

For a fraction of a second, I thought I had, but it turns out that I was mixing with M. John Harrison.

(which I do not recommend. Read the first book of the Kefahuchi Tract trilogy, and it was enough for me)
 

Campbell1oo4

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For a fraction of a second, I thought I had, but it turns out that I was mixing with M. John Harrison.

(which I do not recommend. Read the first book of the Kefahuchi Tract trilogy, and it was enough for me)
Viriconium by M. John Harrison got a second life through Neil Gaiman's recent campaign to reprint the stories he loved as a child. I first listened to it as an audio book, and then bought it on Amazon so I could own a copy.

It's a collection of short stories all set in Viriconium, a city that seems to exist outside of time and space. The whole thing is super meta. Harrison hated the idea of world building, and so he described the city differently in every story.

It doesn't really work, in my opinion. A big part of fantasy is escapism into another world. We want to investigate and discover things.

The book is worth reading because it is beautiful English. Harrison left fantasy in order to write poetry, and I can see why. It's like someone took all the composition of a masterpiece painting and translated it into text.
 
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Ukerric

Bearded Ape
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The book is worth reading because it is beautiful English. Harrison left fantasy in order to write poetry, and I can see why. It's like someone took all the composition of a masterpiece painting and translated it into text.
The bit about hating world building now makes sense. Because if there's something that really needs worldbuilding, it's SF or fantasy.
 
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Arbitrary

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The Screwtape Letters by CS Lewis. I had wanted to read something by him for a while after seeing his quote

cslew.jpg


I liked the book a lot. It's a series of letters written by a senior devil to his nephew Wormwood who is a Tempter working to damn a soul.
 

Himeo

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The first Dostoyevsky book I've read. I figured it would be boring. It wasn't. I assumed it would take a hundred pages or more to become interesting. I was hooked by the end of the first chapter. I believed the most interesting parts of the book were the oft quoted arguments for Atheism. They weren't.

I think this is a book anyone could enjoy reading.

The story momentum dies around the 75% mark. I had to slog through another 10% before it got good again. This is something others have noted as well. Worth the effort.

Do you know, I liked it.
 
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