Woodworking

Intrinsic

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I've done a few projects the past couple of years, nothing crazy and fancy but I like putting things together.

Currently working on a new Entertainment Center idea because I've disliked my Ikea one and want something larger and more open.

Found this design at West Elm (Staggered Wood Console (76")) and liked the layout but really don't like the small pieced together wood look, or color, or price, or dimensions. Want to change that up and also modify the dimensions to fit my needs in the living room.

Using SketchUp to plan it out and am coming across a few questions because most of the stuff I've done in the past is typical "box" style cabinet and plywood work. This will be a little different and am not 100% on addressing the concerns. Could always throw it together and learn along the way, which is how the last couple of years have gone.

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Was considering layering 1x2s together for the faces and using a mitre edge to join. Not 100% sure 1.5" is enough for the face edges or if that'll look too thin. It is a 7' long base with the two "floating" shelves 5' long which gives me 2' to work with in the open spaces. I wanted a little more open space for albums to stand and other tall pieces but may adjust those.

I don't want it to be fully floating, I think that'd be too modern for me. So I'll either do a back piece in between the middle shelves for support and may also find some round iron or something for additional support at the end.

18" depth is a little larger also because my receiver is too deep for my existing 14" depth stand. Didn't want to run in to that. Also makes it an even 25 1x2s if I go this route.

I don't really have a local wood place for anything exotic or really raw. Not against milling down my own for other options. If that is thicker and wider boards. But wanted to try something new. Figuring $150 in pine or like $350 in oak, but again that is just with access to Lowe's or Home Depot stock. Really need to ask around and see where other people go for projects.

Can also post some other stuff I've put together.
 

Intrinsic

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Do you have a planer?

No.

That was one of the challenges I thought about going this direction. That is a lot of surface area to try and hand plane with all those stacked pieces and not sure I want to go the router jig method, but could be interesting.

Was trying to avoid buying another toy, hah!
 

mkopec

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Planer alone would not do it because the planer relies on a relatively true planar surface to make the opposite one true to that first face. This is why you would need a joiner first which makes one of those faces true, so that the planar can use to make the other one true.

But if your stock you use is relatively OK and true, you just have to make sure you glue them straight. SO while you apply force across the glued pieces to keep them together, you need to apply some force in the opposite direction to make sure the glued pieces stay straight. Then you should not have a problem justt using a standard scraper for the glue and sander after. This does not have to be 100% true. Like below for example..

glue.PNG


I see a problem with your joints on that project. I would opt to use more of a box joint rather than a 45 miter to join them all together. Its stronger joint as the glue surface is bigger.

box_joint.PNG


If you cant do box joint I would at least use some type of reinforcement.
 

LachiusTZ

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I meant an industrial planer...

I don't think anyone in the town I live in has one, it's one of the things I really miss about Dallas. All that crap was accessible.

mkopec mkopec I don't know what a joiner is, so I'm prolly more wrong now than I was 10 minutes ago. Lol
 
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mkopec

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You can get a 12" planer for home. I have one. But yeah, if you have access to someone that can do this for you then it a no brainer. Glue the shit up, let it cure, then take it there for plane and sand.
 
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TheBeagle

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If you ever try dovetails, don't expect success on your first try. Practice on some scraps. Holy shit it's harder than it looks.
 
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Intrinsic

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You can get a 12" planer for home. I have one. But yeah, if you have access to someone that can do this for you then it a no brainer. Glue the shit up, let it cure, then take it there for plane and sand.

Yeah that would be optimal and kind of back to my statement about having a local wood spot to get good / better stock than HD or Lowe's and have access to pieces, parts, and people that can assist locally. They're there but not within my social group and it sounds like a lot of effort.

Not against the box joint, just isn't my favorite. Was going more for the mitre for a waterfall edge type look. Could do a spline in it but yeah, with that much weight it was definitely a concern.

1603807688552.png


That was what I was thinking about for back support, would also aid in cable management, then could additionally add something in the corners.
 

Captain Suave

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I don't know what a joiner is, so I'm prolly more wrong now than I was 10 minutes ago. Lol
A jointer (note the "t" if you're googling) is a machine for making one surface of a board flat, and for making adjacent faces perpendicular. This is subtly but importantly different from a planer, which makes opposite faces parallel at a given thickness. You need both (or the skill to accomplish both with hand tools) so that you end up with rectangular boards instead of parallelograms or twisted extrusions.


Was considering layering 1x2s together for the faces and using a mitre edge to join.

I strongly recommend using wide boards instead of edge laminations. Laminating is a fucking pain in the ass. If you want it to turn out well you have to do a huge amount of accurate milling, it's slow, you will need SO MANY CLAMPS, and inevitably the first few times your projects will end up twisted unless you are VERY careful and know what you're doing with cauls. They're popular now because they lower wood cost and are relatively easy to do with industrial scale equipment, but IMO boards are many times easier and look better.

I've done several project with lamination simply because wood at these dimensions doesn't exist at a reasonable cost, but I didn't enjoy it.

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Intrinsic

Person of Whiteness
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A jointer (note the "t" if you're googling) is a machine for making one surface of a board flat, and for making adjacent faces perpendicular. This is subtly but importantly different from a planer, which makes opposite faces parallel at a given thickness. You need both (or the skill to accomplish both with hand tools) so that you end up with rectangular boards instead of parallelograms or twisted extrusions.




I strongly recommend using wide boards instead of laminations. Laminating is a fucking pain in the ass. If you want it to turn out well you have to do a huge amount of accurate milling, it's slow, you will need SO MANY CLAMPS, and inevitably the first few times your projects will end up twisted unless you are VERY careful and know what you're doing with cauls. They're popular now because they lower wood cost and are relatively easy to do with industrial scale equipment, but IMO boards are many times easier and look better.

I've done several project with lamination simply because wood at these dimensions doesn't exist at a reasonable cost, but I didn't enjoy it.

View attachment 312829View attachment 312831

yeah was looking for some feedback on your experience after you posted your workbench in the other thread. I’ll keep mulling it over and see where I want to go then report back.
 

Aamry

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I'm a woodturner myself, currently working on a very expensive gag/white elephant gift for a friend. A 36" pepper mill, made from walnut, poplar, and purple heart. When it's complete, it should hold ~2 pounds of peppercorns. Here is the first half glued up last night. Sorry if the picture is huge.

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Kovaks

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I don't jave a planer or jointer right now, and no space for anything other than maybe a dewalt 735x, I just suck up the cost and buy S3S lumber and dig through the pile for flat boards. Needed an extra board of beach for the desk I'm currently working on, went in yesterday and they had almost nothing, had to dig to the bottom for a flat strait board. If you do end doing mitered joints I am really liking the dowel key jig I got from Rockler recently
Rockler Corner Key Doweling Jig
 

whoo

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If you live within 2-3 hours of a big city that has a real lumber supplier (not building materials, but fine wood /cabinetmakers supply), have them S4S the boards for you. Its half the cost of Lowes /HD. If you're going to hang it, dont assemble the joints before you hang it unless its braced square. Otherwise they will break. You could hang the horizontals like floating shelves, then use dovetails, box joints, dowel joints, etc for the verticals. Since the verticals wouldn't be structural, a doweled half lap would be decorative and sturdy. You only need a drill, dowels, glue, and a table saw or rabbet plane.

Good luck!
 

Lanx

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my latest wood working project is figuring out that an acordian folder
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is a good way to organize sand paper grit, the 24 section kind is enough to sand paper from 40 grit to 3000 grit.

note, i have no fucking idea why i have so much sand paper and more grits than what menards offers...

i also have a ryobi belt sander
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that has seen more use in smoothing out my garage floor that i patch, than has seen a piece of wood, so theres that
 
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jooka

marco esquandolas
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When I was in high school I ended up doing a summer apprentice making koa ukulele's with a guy I sold pot to, was a ton of fun. Every time I see a video of a diy cnc router I am sooooo down with getting one but of course zero space to actually have one. :(
 

BrutulTM

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stool1.jpg

stool2.jpg


This is a project I did for my 3 year old nephew a few months back. I seriously underestimated the difficulty of making those angled mortise and tenon joints. A router wasn't really an option because of the angles so I made them with a chisel and had to make almost every piece more than once because I split it in half trying to cut those mortises. The resulting joints aren't very straight or very tight but with enough epoxy they filled up. There's a million ways to make this thing more easily but it was a good learning experience, or at least a lesson in managing rage.