The House Plants Thread

Big Phoenix

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Also my little pepper planet has finally been able to have some fruit set on it. It was flowering all summer long but a few days after the pepper would start growing it would just die.
20181013_144734.jpg


And the stupid palm tree in my front yard decided to bloom again. Thing is just tall enough that I cant get the stalks myself even with a 20 foot pole.

20180915_173020.jpg
 

Serpens

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Really nice. The green one is a calathea. I have one of those and it behaves just like the gif. They are bitch to maintain though. After I bought mine it was fine for about six months but then the leaf edges started turning brown and crispy. Supposedly it is due to low humidity and even though I live in a fairly high humidity place it is not enough. Considering laying it to rest unfortunately.
 

AngryGerbil

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That purple one looks exactly like my shamrock except... my shamrock isn't purple.

But leaves, flowers, opening and closing of the leaves, shape, it all looks the exact same.
 

Caliane

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Theres a bunch of things called Shamrock.

Traditionally, "shamrock" would be a clover.
Trifolium Dubium, trifolium repens, or Trifolium Pratense.
Lesser, White, and Red clover.

It could also be Oxalis Acetosella. aka, Wood Sorrel. wood sorrel also confused with clover.
Medicago Lupulina is also a 3 leaved clover looking plant. aka. black medick.


The above is:
Oxalis triangularis - Wikipedia
A woodsorrel. common as a houseplant.
and yes, they also come in green.
 
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AngryGerbil

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Theres a bunch of things called Shamrock.

Traditionally, "shamrock" would be a clover.
Trifolium Dubium, trifolium repens, or Trifolium Pratense.
Lesser, White, and Red clover.

It could also be Oxalis Acetosella. aka, Wood Sorrel. wood sorrel also confused with clover.
Medicago Lupulina is also a 3 leaved clover looking plant. aka. black medick.


The above is:
Oxalis triangularis - Wikipedia
A woodsorrel. common as a houseplant.
and yes, they also come in green.
Good to know! Thanks for the info.

What you have pictured there is what I have in my house.
 

AngryGerbil

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What you have pictured there is what I have in my house.
Actually.... no it's not. What you have pictured has rounded leaf edges. Mine has more cut or angled leaf edges, like the purple one in the gif.

The one I have is exactly like the purple one in the gif... only green. The one you posted has rounded edges. They all have the same flowers and stems though.

It's too bad that biology is so simplistic, non-complex, and easily categorized! (tongue-in-cheek jab at Vanessa).
 

Mr_Bungle

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Really nice. The green one is a calathea. I have one of those and it behaves just like the gif. They are bitch to maintain though. After I bought mine it was fine for about six months but then the leaf edges started turning brown and crispy. Supposedly it is due to low humidity and even though I live in a fairly high humidity place it is not enough. Considering laying it to rest unfortunately.

leaf crisping can happen if the water has chlorine or a high salt content. you could use bottled/distilled/filtered water. That particular cultivar of Calathea is notorious for being on the more sensitive side of the species.
 
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Serpens

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leaf crisping can happen if the water has chlorine or a high salt content. you could use bottled/distilled/filtered water. That particular cultivar of Calathea is notorious for being on the more sensitive side of the species.
Mine is actually Calathea ornata:

Calathea ornnata.JPG


When the condition first started, I went to the nursery where I bought it for advice, and they said the same thing as you. So I tried bottled water for awhile and it didn't help the next set of leaves. Perhaps I didn't try it long enough, so I will attempt it again. I really like the looks of it, so I would hate to throw it out.
 
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Mr_Bungle

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Those leaves you posted look great! Don't get discouraged. The house I'm currently living in has a wood stove blasting all day rendering my environment dry as a bone. Have you checked the bottom of the pot? There may be salt build up that resembles a chalky coating that is visible from the outside. If that is the reality I would advise transplanting to a new pot and scrubbing the old one. Additionally, you could also try and flush the salts out by watering your plant in the sink and letting the plant get maximum pour through.
 
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popsicledeath

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Maybe it is as simple as needing more humidity? Do you have a humidifier in the house? Some of my plants were getting a bit crispy, so got a humidifier. The plants are happier, and I'm realizing I was getting a bit crispy too and it's help my hands from drying out.
 
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Serpens

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Oh I see! Is this plant next to a draft or heating duct? Another symptom of crispy leaves is over fertilization or fertilizing during the winter/dormant season.
It's near a patio door that is usually open during the day, so it will get an occasional outdoor breeze. I live in SoCal near the ocean so it is usually above 50% humidity except during Santa Ana wind conditions. And I don't fertilize my plants when they're not growing.

At the same time I tried the bottled water, I moved the plant away from the patio door, so since neither worked at the time, I moved it back. This plant is a bitch!
 
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Mr_Bungle

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It's near a patio door that is usually open during the day, so it will get an occasional outdoor breeze. I live in SoCal near the ocean so it is usually above 50% humidity except during Santa Ana wind conditions. And I don't fertilize my plants when they're not growing.

At the same time I tried the bottled water, I moved the plant away from the patio door, so since neither worked at the time, I moved it back. This plant is a bitch!

I'm sorry man I have no idea as to what the problem could be other than wind burn. Although that is more prominent in plants during bad transport or constant winds like in an open yard, unlike near a patio door. I've never had that problem with a calathea before. I hope the plant figures it's shit out soon. Best of luck.
 

Mr_Bungle

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The 2nd most expensive addition and incidentally the biggest pain in the ass to take care of, needing constant humidity to keep the board wet. The vine, in the right conditions, should root to the board with the leaves wrapping around the sides as tight as wallpaper. This plant has the potential to grow 3 meters in length with leaves that are about the size of roofing shingles.








 

Mr_Bungle

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I have this cultivar of Calathea. A few of the leaves have suffered damage from lack of water, constant dryness and dust build up preventing maximum transpiration and photosynthesis.